Apple Macintosh Magazines Memorabilia Collection

The Apple Macintosh changed computing history forever.

Before Apple introduced its Macintosh computer, all computers ran on a “command-line” interface. You would tell the computer what to do by typing your commands and pressing the enter key. All interaction between human and computer was accomplished by typing on the keyboard, with the results displayed with green or white letters on a black screen. The Mac changed all that; it was the first computer ever to have a graphical user interface. Nobody had ever seen a mouse before!

Soon, all computers had mice and graphical interfaces.
All your files, folders, and documents were presented in windows that you could drag around the screen with the mouse. You would choose commands with menus that dropped down from the top of the screen. But the Macintosh (and its mom, the Lisa) was the first. It pioneered this wonderful new way of working and playing.

Introduced in 1984 (with that iconic Super Bowl ad), the Apple Macintosh
single-handedly changed the way people interacted with their computers, forever.

This rich collection of magazines were published when the Mac was new,
and thoroughly chronicles the early days of this brave new world;
this absolutely magnificent sea-change in computing history.

And you can have it all in your library!


Apple Macintosh Magazines Memorabilia Collection

To help celebrate Apple’s 40th Anniversary, here is the definitive Macintosh Collector’s dream magazine package, and it’s all about the entire collection; together. These magazines are not for sale individually, all 39 publications are being sold only as a collection.

I’m sure you can find some of these titles here and there, but nowhere will you find all of them all in one place like you have here in this collection. You can relive the first year; the second, and the third (and some later years), of the Mac’s glorious history all over again!

The diversity of the collection makes it extra-special; to summarize, you have the first five issues of Macworld magazine (and nine later issues). Macworld was the definitive source for Macintosh information at the time, and still is today. However, Macworld has gone to a digital-only format. You can no longer walk up to a newsstand and buy an actual physical paper copy of Macworld magazine anymore, and so naturally we’ve included the LAST paper issue from November 2014!

There are two issues of TIME magazine with Steve Jobs on the cover; there are all the other early independent magazines focussed on the Mac that not many people even remember today; ST.MAC and The MACazine, and various other titles; A+ Magazine, some Macintosh Buyer’s Guides, and others. And they’re just packed with ads for products of the day, it’s absolutely fascinating to see how amazingly high the prices were then for software, memory, and storage. I remember a box of five 400kb floppies was fifty dollars; what hard drives you could get in those days were measured in megabytes, a megabyte is a thousandth of a gigabyte, the standard number we’re all used to hearing today!

Okay, enough preamble; let’s get into what’s in the box!
(and don’t forget to see if there’s a “One More Thing” at the bottom of the page!


There are three issues of A+ magazine. A+ was originally aimed at Apple II computer users; of course all that changed with the release of the Mac! There’s the March ’85 issue, the August ’85 issue, and the November 1985 issue.

Apple Macintosh Magazines Memorabilia Collection

There are four issues of ST.MAC from mid-1984; the April, May, June, and July 1984 issues. This was one of the first independent magazines, other than Macworld magazine itself.

There are four issues of ST.MAC; all four
There are four issues of ST.MAC, the first two
There are four issues of ST.MAC, and the next two

Next, a varied assortment. There is a July/August 1985 issue of SoftGuide Buyers Guide magazine, a January 2002 issue of Time magazine with Steve Jobs smiling on the cover (love the expression on his face!) introducing the new “Sunflower” iMac, and the July 2000 issue of Macintosh FAQ from David Lerner’s TEKSERVE, “The Old Reliable Mac Service Shop” located in New York City, which is now closed permanently.

Apple Macintosh Magazines Memorabilia Collection

There is the May 27, 1996 issue of MacWEEK, the Newsweekly for Macintosh Managers. You remember how difficult it was to get a subscription to this publication? But if you could, it sure was great to find it in the mailbox each week.

MacWEEK, the Newsweekly for Macintosh Managers.

Jumping ahead a bit... the April 12, 2010 issue of TIME Magazine. This was TIME’s cover story about the then-new iPad. Who could predict what a remarkable success the iPad would be in its first year, and how it would change the world for so many specific groups of people for years after? Well, the man whose smiling visage graces the cover of this highly-collectible magazine probably knew.

Steve Jobs introduces the iPad

Now, we’re back to the eighties. There are four issues of the Macintosh Buyers Guide. This is a publication just packed with hundreds of products relating to the Macintosh, all with complete, detailed descriptions. We have the Premier Issue from Winter 1984, the next issue from Spring 1985, the Fall 1985 issue, and then the Fall 1988 issue. 

There are four issues of the Macintosh Buyers Guide
the Macintosh Buyers Guide is a publication just packed with hundreds of products relating to the Macintosh, here's two
the Macintosh Buyers Guide is a publication just packed with hundreds of products relating to the Macintosh, and here's two more
the Macintosh Buyers Guide is a publication just packed with hundreds of products relating to the Macintosh, here's a detail page from one of the first Macintosh datatbase programs, Microsoft File

There are nine issues of the The MACazine, an ICONcepts publication. Widely considered to be the premier independent Mac magazine, other than Macworld, of course. There’s the first issue from January 1984, the February 1985 and March 1985 issues; the April 1985, July 1985, and August 1985 issues; and then the January 1986, November 1986, and July 1987 issues.   

There are nine issues of the The MACazine, an ICONcepts publication. Widely considered to be the premier third-party Mac magazine, after Macworld, of course. Here's the first three.
There are nine issues of the The MACazine, an ICONcepts publication. Widely considered to be the premier third-party Mac magazine, after Macworld, of course. Here's the second three
There are nine issues of the The MACazine, an ICONcepts publication. Widely considered to be the premier third-party Mac magazine, after Macworld, of course. ANd here's three more. Note the logo change.

drum roll please...

And now, we come to the cream of the crop: the first five issues of Macworld magazine.

(There’s also three later issues covering significant events in Macintosh history, and five interesting issues from 1986-7, and the LAST print issue from November 2014, but more on those later.)

And now, we come to the cream of the crop: the first five issues of Macworld magazine.

The Premier Issue features the iconic image of the three Macintosh computers on a table with Steve Jobs standing behind them wearing a suit and a smirk! The Premier Issue covered, of course, the new technology of the Macintosh (the public had never seen a mouse before), Microsoft Multiplan, the first Mac spreadsheet, MacPaint, MacWrite, with detailed features on these all-new products, and a rich story of the team responsible for the development of the Mac, including a feature on Bill Atkinson, who wrote the QuickDraw graphics routines that powered both the Lisa and the Macintosh display. And, of course, he also authored the Mac’s very first showpiece software application, MacPaint.  (and later in 1987, the revolutionary HyperCard.)

The Premier Issue of Macworld Magazine features the iconic image of the three Macintosh computers on a table with Steve Jobs standing behind them wearing a suit and a smirk!
Here's a spread from The Premier Issue of Macworld Magazine featuring Bill Akinson's revolutionary MacPaint software application
Here's a spread from The Premier Issue of Macworld Magazine featuring Microsoft's MultiPlan software application, the precursor to Microsoft Excel

Macworld magazine was initially released every two months; the second issue from May/June 1984 had a red cover and featured articles on Microsoft Chart, Macintosh Pascal (the programming language), the connection with the Apple Lisa, number of other stories on how the hot new Macintosh works. 

The third issue of Macworld, July/August 1984, had features about the Apple modem and how it communicates with other computers and with mainframes, the newly-released MacProject, the highly-anticipated Microsoft Word, and stories on Apple’s very cool education initiatives. 

Macworld magazine was initially released every two months; the second issue from May/June 1984 had a red cover and featured articles on Microsoft Chart, Macintosh Pascal (the programming language), the connection with the Apple Lisa, number of other stories on how the hot new Macintosh works. 

The third issue of Macworld, July/August 1984, had features about the Apple modem and how it communicates with mainframes and other computers, the newly-released MacProject, the highly-anticipated Microsoft Word, and stories on Apple's education initiatives.

The fourth issue of Macworld magazine (and one of my personal favorites), September/October 1984, featured MacDraw – Apple’s recently introduced drafting set. MacDraw was the first vector-based drawing program, absolutely one of my favorite pieces of software ever. There is an article about the Macintosh game wizards, an article about the ImageWriter dot-matrix printer, and a feature on using Microsoft Chart and Microsoft Multiplan together. 

Starting with the fifth issue, Macworld magazine went to a monthly publication schedule. The November 1984 issue was primarily about the highly-anticipated second iteration of the Macintosh, the “Fat Mac”. Finally, a 512K Macintosh, a significant jump over the 128K memory limitation of the original Macintosh. 


Then we have the three additional bonus Macworld magazines, all covering major event milestones. The Mac Plus, The Mac SE and the Mac II, and Bill Atkinson’s revolutionary HyperCard software, which was kind of a preview of what we would much later see on the Internet, with pages (“cards” in HyperCard) linking together. 

The April 1986 issue covers the release of the Macintosh Plus, with in-depth coverage. The Mac Plus was the first computer I owned: I was a photographer and layout artist then (my son was born on Father’s Day in 1984, I spent all my money on diapers and formula before I could finally afford a Mac! But I used a Mac every time I could get near one, I spent my lunch-hours in computer stores until they kicked me out).

A little trivia for you… the first release of Adobe Illustrator was the very first software to “require a Macintosh Plus or better”; it wouldn’t run on a 512k. I actually created mechanicals for slides using MacDraw on my Plus. We would take the LaserWriter printouts, make film negatives, and color them using gels, then shoot the slides on a big Forox pin-registered “animation stand”-type camera. Our in-house typesetting department couldn’t make circles like pie charts, but I did them on my faithful Plus! 

The May 1987 issue covers the release of the Macintosh SE, and has coverage of the previously-released Macintosh II.  

Finally, the October 1987 issue of Macworld covers the revolutionary HyperCard software (another Bill Atkinson creation), and covers the new MultiFinder, which let you run several programs at once; you wouldn’t have to quit MacDraw to then paste your graphic into MacWrite, for example.  

Then we have the three additional bonus Macworld magazines, covering major event milestones. the Mac Plus, The Mac SE and the Mac II, and Bill Atkinson’s revolutionary HyperCard software, which was sort of a preview of what we would see on the Internet with pages (“cards” in HyperCard) linking together. 

Also included are five more issues of Macworld magazine. These are the July, August, October, and November issues from 1986, and the March 1987 issue also.

Also included are five more issues of Macworld magazine. These are the July, August, October, and November issues from 1986, and the March 1987 issue also.

And the FINAL print issue of Macworld magazine. The last paper magazine was the November 2014 issue. Of course, this collection would be woefully incomplete without it!  If we have the first one, then we have to have the last one!

And the FINAL print issue of Macworld magazine. The last paper magazine was the November 2014 issue. Of course, this collection would be woefully incomplete without it! If we have the first one, we have to have the last one!<.

Well, that’s it… this amazing collection of the first Macintosh magazines can be yours today. We are asking eight thousand dollars, very reasonable considering the depth and breadth of the rich history documented between the covers of these publications. Email today for payment and shipping details, or if the collection is even still available, for that matter!



There is “One More Thing”... (in honor of the often-playful showman Steve Jobs, there better be “One More Thing”)  we have a floppy disk from a 3-D type rendering application called Typestry, version 1.0, back in 1992, from a small animation software shop called Pixar.


Gee, I wonder what ever happened to Pixar, if they ever accomplished anything of note. ;-)

Pixar Typestry Macintosh Sofware v1 Floppy Disk from 1992
 

Thanks for joining me on this sweetly-nostalgic journey I embarked on creating this page, and reliving all the fond memories of those times. Hope it was good for you too!